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     / HESP 2001: Tomsk

Course #1

Techniques for Teaching Economics

 

 

  1. Resource People

 

Dr. John A. Tribble (tribbj@sage.edu )

Dr. Manijeh Sabi (sabim@sage.edu )

Dr. Francisco Melero (melerf@sage.edu )

 

  1. Course Description

 

This course introduces participants to the new technologies for teaching economics. Its focus is on principles of macro and micro economics. In this course participants will learn how to design effective WEB explorations assignments; how to organize and present images that teach economic content; and how to utilize games and role-playing to involve the student in experiencing economic concepts; how to employ Blackboard course management tools to efficiently communicate with students. Economic concepts to be covered include scarcity, supply and demand, the nature of money, economic productivity, economic growth, the nature of competition, and GDP measurement. Among the elements of the course:

      A WEB based search and presentation of productive capacity around the globe;

      a game of buying and selling on credit to demonstrate the impact of a fractional reserve banking system;

      group analysis of case studies of market structure and degrees of competition.

 

Participants in the course will be introduced to the course management tool Blackboard, which will be used to integrate instruction in all three of the summer school courses.

 

3.                Course Requirements and Schedule

 

The course will be offered over a five-day period. Morning sessions will emphasize teaching techniques with demonstrations utilizing economic concepts. Each morning session will end with a 3-minute graded evaluation.

 

In the afternoon sessions participants will develop applications in a directed workshop. Each participant will prepare a portfolio of applications which will be evaluated at the end of the course.

 

In this course instructions will be distributed for the presentations to be made

at the end of the third course, "Transitional Economics - A Capstone Seminar."

 

 

DETAILED PLAN - Techniques for Teaching Economics

 

DAY ONE

date: June 18

Morning Session

time: 9:30 to 12:30

 

topic(s): Designing Effective WEB Explorations

Scarcity - Exploration of economic well-being around the world

 

 

instructor(s): Dr. John A. Tribble

 

format: Lecture, classroom demonstration

 

required reading:

Peter Navarro "Economics in the Cyber-Classroom" Journal of Economic Perspectives (Spring 2000), pp. 119-132.

George Bredon "Net News -- Old Wine in a New Bottle?" Journal of Economic Education (Winter 1999), pp. 28 -32.

 

supplementary reading:

Richard A. Fritensky "The Use of Electronic Assignments in Introductory Economics Classes" for presentation to The Committee on Economic Education (Boston 2000 ASSA meetings).

 

 

assignments: Morning evaluation.

Break

 

Afternoon Session

time: 2:30 to 4:30

 

topic(s):

Supply and Demand - Automobiles in the Global Market Place

 

format: workshop and small group activities

 

required reading:

John F. Chizmar and Mark S. Walbert "Web-Based Learning Environments: Guided by Principles of Good Teaching Practice" Journal of Economic Education (Summer 1999), pp. 248 - 264.

 

 

assignments: To develop a lesson plan for exploring the global demand and supply of automobiles.

Break

 

Other activities

Individual or small group instruction on exploring the WEB.

 

 

DAY TWO

date: June 19, 2001

Morning Session

time: 9:30 to 12:30

 

topic(s): Using Imagery to Teach Economics

Poverty a Global Problem

Scarce Resources - The Oceans

 

instructor(s): Dr. John A. Tribble

 

format: lecture and classroom demonstration

 

required reading:

Kenneth D. Peterson, Jr. "Using Geographic Information System to Teach Economics" Journal of Economic Education (Spring 2000), pp. 169-178.

 

assignments: Morning Evaluation

Break

 

Afternoon Session

time: 2:30 to 4:30

 

topic(s): Maps - Economic Development

 

 

format: workshop and small group activities

 

required reading:

Squareone-Learning "An investigation of the layers of learning and insight available through cartoons and Laughter" http://squareone-learning.com/sq1_cartoontool.html as downloaded 8/2/2000.

 

supplementary reading:

Ohio State University Libraries "Teaching with Cartoon Art: A Selected Bibliography" http://apollo.lib.ohio-state.edu/cgaweb/teaching.htm as down loaded 8/2/2000.

 

assignments: To develop an application illustrating the economic relations between participants country and the global economy

Break

 

Other activities

Individual and group session on using the WEB to extract economic imagery for inclusion in demonstrations and publications.

 

 

DAY THREE

date: June 20, 2001

Morning Session

time: 9:30- 12:30

 

topic(s): Using Games and Simulations to Teach Economics

Market Structure - "The Prisoners Dilemma"

Market Structure - "A Free Entry and Exit Experiment" (The Farmers Decision)

 

instructor(s): Dr. John A. Tribble

 

format: lecture and classroom demonstration

 

required reading:

"Teaching economics with classroom experiments: A symposium" Southern Economic Journal (January 1999), pp. 603-610.

Charles A. Holt and Monica Capra "Classroom Games: A Prisoner's Dilemma" Journal of Economic Education (Summer 2000), pp. 229 - 236.

Rod Garratt "A Free Entry and Exit Experiment" Journal of Economic Education (Summer 2000), pp. 237-243.

 

Supplementary reading:

J. Patrick Meister "Oligopoly -- An In Class Economic Game" Journal of Economic Education (Fall 1999), pp. 383-391.

 

assignments: Morning Evaluation

Break

 

Afternoon Session

time: 2:30 to 4:30

 

topic(s): Money in a Fractional Reserve Banking System

 

 

format: workshop and small group activities

 

required reading: - John A. Tribble "The Penny Jar National Bank" unpublished classroom exercise, 1995.

 

assignments: To develop an applications on money and the banking system in the participants country.

Break

 

Other activities

Individual and group instruction on exploration of the WEB for financial information.

 

 

 

DAY FOUR

date: June 21, 2001

Morning Session

time: 9:30 to 12:30

 

topic(s): Role Playing to Teach Economics

Prioritizing Macroeconomic Problems

 

instructor(s): Dr. John A. Tribble

 

format: lecture and classroom demonstration

 

required reading:

John F. Lobuts Jr.; Hamilton Beazley, "The teacher, the learner, the teacher, the learner: And the cycle continues" Simulation and Gaming (September 1999), pp. 337-341.

 

Supplementary reading: Joni Hersch and W. Kip Viscusi "The Courtroom Comes to the Classroom: Estimating Economic Damages as an Instructional Device" Journal of Economic Education (Fall 1998) , pp. 301-311.

 

assignments: Morning Evaluation

Break

 

Afternoon Session

time: 2:30 to 4:30

 

topic(s): Setting Monetary Policy Objectives.

 

 

format: workshop and small group activities

 

required reading:

Michael H. Truscott, Hemant Rustogi, and Corinne B. Young "Enhancing the Macroeconomics Course: An Experiential Learning Approach" Journal of Economic Education (Winter 2000), pp. 60-65.

 

assignments: To develop a role playing model for starting a new new business in the participants economy.

Break

 

Other activities

Individual and group instruction on running a paperless classroom.

 

 


 

DAY FIVE

date: June 22, 2001

Morning Session

time: 9:30 - 12:30

 

topic(s): Journals and Writing Assignments to Teach Economics

Labor Markets

 

 

instructor(s): Dr. John A. Tribble and Dr. Manijeh Sabi

 

format: lecture and classroom demonstration

 

required reading:

Rebecca O'Rourke "The learning journal: from chaos to coherence" Assessment and Evaluation in Higher Education (December 1998) pp. 403-414.

Murray S. Simpson and Shireen E. Carroll "Assignments for a Writing-Intensive Economics Course" Journal of Economic Education (Fall 1999), pp. 402-410.

 

 

supplementary reading:

Johnathan B. Wright "Using Electronic Data Tools in Writing Assignments" Journal of Economic Literature (Winter 1999), pp. 21 - 27.

 

assignments: Morning Evaluation

Break

 

Afternoon Session

time: 2:30 to 4:30

 

topic(s): The Global Economy

 

 

format: workshop and small group activities

 

required reading:

Global Exchange "10 Ways to Democratize the Global Economy" http://www.globalexchange.org/economy/econ101/ as downloaded 8/4/2000.

Kevin Danaher "Seven Arguments for Reforming the World Economy" The Global Exchange http://www.globalexchange.org/economy/econ101/sevenArguments.html as downloaded 8/4/2000.

Development Committee - World Bank "Small States: Meeting Challenges in the Global Economy" (March 24, 2000) http://www.worldbank.org/html/extdr/smallstates/ as downloaded 8/4/2000.

 

assignments: To develop an application using student writing assignments for exploring the world as a global economy.